New PDF release: A vocabulary and outlines of grammar of the Nitlakapamuk or

By J B Good

ISBN-10: 066502276X

ISBN-13: 9780665022760

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Extra resources for A vocabulary and outlines of grammar of the Nitlakapamuk or Thompson tongue : the Indian language spoken between Yale, Lillooet, Cache Creek and Nicola Lake : together with a phonetic Chinook dictionary, adapted for use in the province of British Columbia

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The string [from the reef ate algae] cannot be a sentence fragment (42a), nor can it be moved (42b): (42) (a) Q. What did the Wsh do? A. *From the reef ate algae. (b) *From the reef ate/eat algae is what the Wsh did. If we adopt the compositionality hypothesis, we thus see a striking correspondence between our syntactic evidence and our semantics. This is not to say that there is always a one-to-one relationship between constituent structure and semantics. Another advantage to adopting both a hierarchical constituent structure and the compositionality hypothesis is that it allows a straightforward account of many syntactically ambiguous sentences.

Often, however, these approaches rest on vastly diVerent sets of assumptions about what these notations mean. It is worth having a precise, framework-neutral, deWnition of the properties of syntactic descriptions to serve as a reference point for the more intricate theory-internal notions. Axiomization into logical notation can serve us in this primarily deWnitional role. For example, if a particular theoretical perspective suggests that linear precedence relations are derived from something else (say headedness parameters (Travis 1984) or a secondary relation like c-command (Kayne 1994), or are ‘‘relaxed’’, as in McCawley 1982, 1987, 1989), it is useful to have a precise characterization of what the relationship being relaxed or derived is.

Missile. So an anti missile missile is a missile that attacks missiles. This circumWxation can be applied an inWnite number of times: an anti anti missile missile missile, is a missile that attacks missiles that attack other missiles. (14) (i) missile (ii) anti missile missile (iii) anti anti missile missile missile In this language, then, we have a pattern where the number of times the word missile is found is exactly one more than the number of times the word anti is found (antin missilenþ1 ).

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A vocabulary and outlines of grammar of the Nitlakapamuk or Thompson tongue : the Indian language spoken between Yale, Lillooet, Cache Creek and Nicola Lake : together with a phonetic Chinook dictionary, adapted for use in the province of British Columbia by J B Good


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